Thoughts

The Death of Learning and Development

Written by David D’Souza for for #Ozlearn on 9 March 2015.

I remember 2015 like it was yesterday, it was such a hopeful time to be around Learning and Development professionals, we stood on the verge of a brave new world, full of change and opportunity. 10 years on and it seems bizarre that we hadn’t seen it coming, that the death of our profession had been so very close – and in some ways so obvious – but we didn’t see the signs. Maybe we just didn’t want to.

The death of HR was being mentioned everywhere, maybe that was the critical thing that distracted us and possibly we felt safe by comparison, it’s hard to tell. HR were trying to be all strategic and the one...

Only creatives can refashion our old models

Written by Sir Martin Sorrell for telegraph.co.uk on 6 September 2014.

Creative industries add £71bn a year to the economy, while supporting 1.7m jobs - they should not hide their light under a bushel.

Government and the creative industries are not always the happiest of bedfellows. The most recent manifestation of this sometimes-awkward relationship was David Cameron’s “Cool Britannia II” summer garden party, which the press judged to be even less cool than Tony Blair’s 1997 original.

The headlines were all about the celebrities who, anticipating fatal damage to their credibility, found reasons to stay away. The point of the event, somewhat lost amid the sniggering of journalists and MPs, was to recognise the important contribution these industries – from...

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How to write…

On 7 September 1982, original “Mad Man”, David Ogilvy sent the following internal memo to all agency employees, titled “How to Write”:

The better you write, the higher you go in Ogilvy & Mather. People who think well, write well.

Woolly minded people write woolly memos, woolly letters and woolly speeches.

Good writing is not a natural gift. You have to learn to write well. Here are 10 hints:

  1. Read the Roman-Raphaelson book on writing. Read it three times.
  2. Write the way you talk. Naturally.
  3. Use short words, short sentences and short paragraphs.
  4. Never use jargon words like reconceptualize, demassification, attitudinally, judgmentally. They are hallmarks of a pretentious ass.
  5. Never write more than two...
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